Mar 022020
 

Every Tuesday I host First Chapter First Paragraph Tuesday Intros sharing the first paragraph or two of a book that I’m reading or plan to read soon

Feel free to join in by posting your own FCFPTI and linking below

Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race

Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race by Margot Lee Shetterly

Chapter One

A Door Opens

Melvin Butler, the personnel officer at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory, had a problem, the scope and nature of which was made plain in a May 1943 telegram to the civil service’s chief of field operations. “This establishment has urgent need for approximately 100 Junior Physicists and Mathematicians, 100 Assistant Computers, 75 Minor Laboratory Apprentices, 125 Helper Trainees, 50 Stenographers and Typists,” exclaimed the missive. Every morning at 7:00 a.m., the bow-tied Butler and his staff sprang to life, dispatching the lab’s station wagon to the local rail depot, the bus station, and the ferry terminal to collect the men and woman-so many women now, each day more women-who had made their way to the lonely finger of land on the Virginia coast. The shuttle conveyed the recruits to the door of the laboratory’s service building on the campus of Langley Field. Upstairs, Butler’s staff whisked them through the first-day stations: forms, photos, and the oath of office: I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic…so help me God.

  26 Responses to “First Chapter First Paragraph Tuesday Intros:
Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race by Margot Lee Shetterly”

  1. I loved the movie, so I want to read the book. Thanks for sharing.

  2. I still haven’t seen the film but now I want to read the book!

  3. I still haven’t seen the film but now I want to read the book!

  4. I never read the book but the movie is so wonderful.

  5. Great choice!

  6. I’ve been meaning to read this book but haven’t found the time. I should see if my digital library has an audiobook copy.

  7. I loved the movie but I haven’t read the book. I’ll have to add it my list.

  8. Such a great movie, so I’m sure the book is just as good if not better.

  9. Sounds like a great read.

  10. This does sound good. I never watched the film as I didn’t want it to spoil my read of the book! And you’ve just reminded me – I still need to read it! 😀

    • I had forgotten to read the book even though when I watched the movie I loved it and was excited to get the book. Then the other day my sister posted on FB that one of the 3 women passed away and it reminded me so I bought the audio.

  11. I hope they got the acknowledgement they deserve.

  12. What a great movie and I loved the book even more. The movie, I guess because of the dramatics needed showed that they had a guy who game them their opportunities. I thought the book was better because it showed that these women earned their recognition basically on their own.

    • 99.9% of the time I think the book is better than the movie. A movie can’t hold everything that’s in a book in 2 hours. I’m not very far into the book yet but already it is so much more in depth than the movie.

  13. Vicki,
    The movie is excellent! Thank you for sharing this intro to the book. It’s terrific!

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