Jun 212014
 

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The History Lover’s Cookbook by Roxe Ann Peacock
Narrated by Dave Wright

Audible Audio Edition
Listening Length: 5 hours and 2 minutes
Program Type: Audiobook
Version: Unabridged
Publisher: Roxe Anne Peacock
Audible.com Release Date: May 8, 2014
Language: English
ASIN: B00KC3CL0M
Over 150 full-color photos inspired by nineteenth century recipes, anecdotes, and the Civil War

History Lover’s Cookbook will transport readers through the Battle of First Bull Run/Manassas to April 9, 1865, where General Robert E. Lee stood under an apple tree to dispatch his surrender to General Grant. Do you know what he was eating when he surrendered?

Prepare a picnic of lemonade, raspberry shrub, mint julep, fried chicken, ham sandwiches, potato salad with boiled dressing, cold slaw, soda biscuits and quince marmalade to observe one of the many Civil War re-enactments throughout the United States.

Enjoy eating tea cakes while viewing more than 150 full-color photos of replica Civil War items, re-enactors portraying Abraham Lincoln, Generals Custer, Lee and Grant, foods and recipes inspired by the nineteenth century.

Share in the Union’s Thanksgiving holiday by preparing recipes from the chapter, Siege at Petersburg.

Find out what General Grant ate every morning with his breakfast.

Roxe Anne Peacock brings the nineteenth century and Civil War era to life through the wonderful photography depicted throughout the book.

Thoughts
This book interested me at first because I wanted to see what kinds of recipes people made in the nineteeth century. The book has so many that I’d like to try, most of them sound really good. Some were a little more complex than others, but all seem to be easily do-able.

In school I loved history class, but it’s been so many years since I was in school, and I haven’t been interested in reading about history since, so I really thought that part of the book would be somewhat boring to me. Man, was I wrong! What kept me interested far more than I would have imagined was the history and miscellaneous info. I was so engrossed while listening to those sections that it surprised me. I learned things about different battles, I loved learning that Custer went to West Point. For some reason that fact really surprised me.

Did you know that in the U.S., blackberries usually peak during June in the South and July in the north. I didn’t. I thought they peaked during the same month. I also learned that the medicinal plants have been used to treat a variety of ailments like dysentery, sore throat, gout, venomous snake bites and other illnesses. Another thing that I found very interesting was that coffee was scarce so some popular substitutes were roasted acorns, okra that were browned, dried sweat potatoes and carrots, wheat berries, barley, beans, beats, bran, cornmeal, cotton seeds, dandelions, peas, persimmons, rice, rye sorghum molasses, and watermelon seeds. Wow, I’d like to know how those substitues compared to the real thing.

I learned that Hardtack was a simple cracker or biscuit made only from flour and water. The only hardtack I’ve ever heard of was a hardtack candy.

There were notes and tidbits included throughout to give a little more interesting information on something that had been covered.

Since I listened to the audible.com version, I’m glad I also had the had the ebook version so that I could see the photos. There were many of them…food, items they used back then, battle re-enactments etc.

Also included in the ebook version was a Measurements & Substitutions Coversions. A few examples are:
1 jigger = 3 tablesoons
1 pony = 2 tablesppons
1 small pinch = 1/16 teaspoon
Indian meal = cornmeal
Gem = muffin or cupcake

The audio was narrated by Dave Wright and I thought he did an excellent job! His voice was smooth and calming. He talked at a pace that was slow enough for you to hear every word clearly, but not slow enough that you got impatient listening to him.

Roxe Anne Peacock did an execellent job with this book, you can tell she put a lot of time into research.

I love love love this book and would recommend it to anyone, whether they’re a history lover or cookbook lover, or both!

This is one of the best cookbooks I’ve ever read and know I’ll be going back to it over and over.

Here is the first recipe I want to try:
Potato Salad
10 large red potatoes (8 cups cooked)
1/2 cup finely chopped onion
1 tablespoon salt
1/2 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper
Boiled Salad Dressing (recipe below)

Wash the potatoes in cold water; drain.
Place then in a large stockpot with enough cold water to cover them.
Cook the potatoes on medium heat until fork tender but before the skins burst.
Cool the potatoes by running cold water over them in a colander.
Peel the slightly cooled skins off the potatoes.
Dice the cooked potatoes into one-half inch cubes.
Place the chopped onions into the bottom of a large bowl.
Put the diced potatoes on thop of the onions.
Add 1 1/2 to 2 cups prepared Boiled Salad Dreesing to the potato salad.
Mix well to incorporate.
Serve immediately or refridgerate.
Best if eaten the same day.

Boiled Salad Dressing
1/2 cup cider vinegar
1/3 cup water
3 tablespoons granulated sugar
2 tablespoons all purpose flour
1 tablespoon dry mustard
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/2 cup heavy cream
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
4 large egg yolks, slightly beaten

Whisk the vinegar, water, sugar, dry mustard, salt and peppers in a medium saucepan until smooth.
Place the pan over medium heat and bring to a simmer; whisking continuously.
Add the heavy cream and unsalted butter; continue whisking until the butter has melted.
In a large bowl, have ready 4 slightly beaten egg yolks.
Slowly stir in small amounts of the hot vinegar until it is incorporated into the egg yolks.
Pour the mixture back into the saucepan.
Heat the mixture on medium-low and continue whisking until the sauce thickens. Do not boil.
Transfer the Boiled Salad Dressing to a large bowl and cool uncovered until the dressing is room temperature.
Refrigerate covered if you are not incorporating the dressing into a recipe immediately.

This dressing is great for potato salad, chicken salad, lettuce salads and cold slaw.

Note: The common size of an egg in the nineteenth century was medium; now it is large

Tidbit: In the nineteenth century, recipes were known as receipts.

Weekend Cooking

  8 Responses to “Audiobook Review:
The History Lover’s Cookbook by Roxe Ann Peacock”

  1. This sounds so good. Is it available as an ebook or print book?

  2. Jama~ It’s available in audio, ebook and print.

  3. I love books that talk about food in history. This one sounds like it would do much better in print (or eBook). I’m not a fan of listening to a narrator read off recipes in an audiobook.

    • I didn’t really mind listening to the recipes. If I heard one that interested me, I just looked it up in the contents in the beginning of the book so I could write it down.

  4. This would be great for a high school history class project; they could make something from the book.

  5. I love the sound of this special cookbook! Thank you for that last “tidbit”! 🙂

  6. I loved the tidbits and notes. I love learning things!

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